Central Idaho Community Guide

Our central Idaho community guide is provided to help those researching the various towns and cities in our area to gather more information about our beautiful locations and the real estate listings available.

Get started by reviewing towns within the central idaho region that contain details available for each location in our community guide.

Cottonwood Idaho

Cottonwood is a city in Idaho CountyIdaho, United States. Located on the Camas Prairie, the population was 900 at the 2010 census, down from 944 in 2000. It is just west of U.S. Route 95, between Grangeville and Lewiston.

Craigmont Idaho

Craigmont is a city in Lewis CountyIdaho. The population was 501 at the 2010 census, down from 556 in 2000.  Craigmont is located on the north border of Idaho County and accessed via the Hwy 95 corridor.

Elk City Idaho

Elk City is an unincorporated census-designated place in Idaho CountyIdaho, United States. As of the 2010 census, its population was 202.  Elk City was the site of a gold strike in 1861, as prospectors rushed south from Pierce, two years before the formation of the Idaho Territory. In the 1870s, Chinese miners leased the claims but were later driven out by mistreatment. Quartz lode operations began in 1902 and dredging in 1935.

Grangeville Idaho

Grangeville is the largest city in and the county seat of Idaho CountyIdaho, United States, in the north central part of the state.[6] Its population was 3,141 at the 2010 census, down from 3,228 in 2000.  Grangeville enjoys close access to thousands of acres of public lands in the Nezperce Clearwater National Forest, as well as scenic and wildlife areas. Whitewater rafting and jet boat activities are popular pursuits and the Clearwater RiverSnake River, and Salmon River flow close by.

Harpster Idaho

Harpster is an unincorporated community in Idaho CountyIdaho, United States. Harpster is located along the South Fork of the Clearwater River and is accessible via Idaho State Highway 13 northwest of Grangeville and south of Stites.
 

Kamiah Idaho

Kamiah (kam-ee-eye) is a city in Idaho and Lewis counties in the U.S. state of Idaho. The largest city in Lewis County, it extends only a small distance into Idaho County, south of Lawyer Creek. The population was 1,295 at the 2010 census, up from 1,160 in 2000. The city lies in the narrow valley of the Clearwater River; downstream are Orofino and Lewiston, at the confluence with the Snake River.
 

Kooskia Idaho

Kooskia (pronounced k00-skee) is a city in Idaho CountyIdaho, United States. It is at the confluence of the South and Middle forks of the Clearwater River, combining to become the main river. The population was 607 at the 2010 census, down from 675 in 2000.  The name of the town is likely a contraction of the Nez Perce word “koos-koos-kia,” a diminutive which refers to the Clearwater River, the lesser of the two large rivers in the vicinity, the other being the Snake.[6] 

Nezperce Idaho

Nezperce (pronounced nez purse) is a city in and the county seat of Lewis County, Idaho, United States. The population was 466 at the 2010 census, down from 523 in 2000. Nezperce is named for the local Nez Perce tribe of Native Americans. There is one school district, Nezperce School District #302.

White Bird Idaho

White Bird is a town in Idaho CountyIdaho, United States. The population was 91 at the 2010 census.  At the southwest corner of the Camas Prairie, White Bird is near the Salmon River crossing point for the Lewis and Clark expedition. It is also the location of the 1877 Battle of White Bird Canyon, which was the first fight of the Nez Perce War and a significant defeat of the U.S. Army. Chief White Bird was a leader of the tribe.

Winchester Idaho

Winchester is a city in Lewis CountyIdaho, United States, located on the north end of the Camas Prairie . The population was 340 at the 2010 census, up from 308 in 2000.  Winchester is within the Nez Perce Indian Reservation,[7] and similar to the opening of lands in Oklahoma, the U.S. government opened the reservation for white settlement in November 1895.